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Blog on All Things Cloud Foundry

.NET on Cloud Foundry, Part 3: Deploying a MapReduce Application with Mono

Alex Makarenko

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

In the previous posts, we created a MapReduce application and successfully deployed it to CF using Iron Foundry. This time, we will try to push it to the original Cloud Foundry using a buildpack based on Mono, an open-source framework that helps to create cross-platform .NET applications.

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.NET on Cloud Foundry, Part 2: Prototyping with Iron Foundry

Alex Makarenko

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Building a MapReduce PoC

Most customers prefer to validate a concept before investing into a production system. In our case, an ultimate solution should allow for long-running computations, have a web interface for setting tasks, and support MapReduce or other data processing methods. So, an ideal prototype would be a platform that provides a simple method for deploying, scaling, and monitoring apps. That is what Iron Foundry does.

In this post, I’ll describe how to create a prototype with Iron Foundry on Cloud Foundry. My test application will use MapReduce to find the most popular words in a text. The picture below demonstrates the data processing workflow.

As you can see, text is transferred from a client to a web component for processing. At this stage, the job is divided between available Mappers. Mappers send the results to a Reducer, which performs final computations and returns the output back to the client via a Notifier. Below, I will describe how to create each of the components, establish communication between them, and deploy an application with Iron Foundry.

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.NET on Cloud Foundry, Part 1: Installation on Windows and Using Iron Foundry

Alex Makarenko

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Creating .NET apps with Iron Foundry

PaaS has revolutionized the way applications are developed and deployed. With reduced delivery cycles and full automation, PaaS users can reach the market faster, significantly improving ROI and time-to-revenue. Cloud Foundry is one of the most popular open-source solutions for enterprises.

Until recently, .NET developers—who constitute a large part of software delivery folks—had rather limited access to Cloud Foundry’s services. The Iron Foundry project has corrected this imbalance by providing support for .NET on Cloud Foundry. It is not merely an extension, but an entire collection of tools and services .NET developers are used to working with, e.g. MS SQL and Message Bus-as-a-Service. Services can be bound to applications, so you do not have to worry about infrastructure and maintenance.

This post starts a series that will explore the capabilities of Iron Foundry. To show you how this platform works and try its services in action, I am going to create a validation prototype using a mixture of .NET and Node.js. I will rely on the Cloud-First approach in my investigation on how application interaction, management, and deployment are implemented in this platform. By the end of the series, you will have learned everything you need to know about creating .NET apps on Iron Foundry.

 
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Cloud Foundry Summit Sessions, “Diego: Re-envisioning the Elastic Runtime”

Vitaly Sedelnik

The amazing session, “Diego: Re-envisioning the Elastic Runtime,” was one of the highlights at this year’s CF Summit. Onsi Fakhouri, Engineering Manager at Pivotal, shared some technical details on Project Diego, including why it is important for Cloud Foundry developers and how it will evolve in the future.

Diego, a large-scale project on which Pivotal is working right now, will introduce a number of significant changes to the Cloud Foundry architecture. Read on to learn about the reasons for this kind of revision, why we should care about Diego, and what impact it will have on Cloud Foundry and PaaS.
 
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How to Install Jenkins CI on Cloud Foundry for Continuous Delivery

Aliaksei Marydashvili

Continuous integration (CI) allows for pushing regular enhancements and bug fixes to your application in an easy, fast, and safe way. When using this practice, every time a developer commits a change, the software has to pass a number of tests. This guarantees that every new release is safe and bug-free. Ultimately, continuous integration can help to automate the entire software delivery process.

Figure 1. Software delivery process based on the continuous integration strategy
Source: Wikipedia

In this blog post, I will explain in detail how to set up continuous delivery for your Ruby on Rails application running on the Cloud Foundry PaaS with Jenkins CI, a popular continuous integration tool.
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MBaaS on Cloud Foundry: How to Deploy Helios

Alexander Sologub

Mobile-backend-as-a-service frameworks appeared to speed up app development by providing/automating such things as user and data management, billing, etc. Thanks to MBaaS, developers can finally concentrate on implementing the features they envisioned, instead of worrying about infrastructure. Dozens of solutions exist today. Paid ones generally offer more advanced features, but there are also some decent open source options.

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Helios MBaaS is one of them. It is an extensible open source mobile backend framework that provides essential services. In fact, it is a Ruby Gem that can be used to build an independent Rack application. It can also be implemented with Sinatra or RoR. Out-of-the-box features include synchronization, push notification, in-app purchases, logging, analytics, and more. In addition, along with LoopBack, it is one of MBaaS frameworks that can be deployed to PaaS systems, such as Heroku or Cloud Foundry.

So, in this tutorial, I will walk you through the steps for deploying Helios with your application to Cloud Foundry.

Things you need to know
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Why Altoros Joins the Cloud Foundry Foundation

Renat Khasanshyn

The momentum behind the Cloud Foundry Foundation signals the arrival of an application-defined infrastructure, where an app can define the underlying infrastructure through an industry-standard API call. As a corporate sponsor of the Cloud Foundry Foundation, Altoros will continue contributing resources and code to help the Foundation fulfill its mission.
CloudFoundryDCMeetup
Recently I wrote a post describing what this announcement [of the Cloud Foundry Foundation] means for enterprise IT customers, why forming the Foundation was necessary, and what it means for IT vendors. You can find it here: “The Cloud Foundry Foundation: a PaaS Revolution?” 

I would like to congratulate my colleagues at Altoros with becoming a corporate sponsor and a Silver Member of the Cloud Foundry Foundation and congratulate our fellow Foundation members, as well. I also want to describe how Altoros has helped the project so far and how we will help the Cloud Foundry Foundation to move forward.
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How to Use MS SQL Server with Cloud Foundry v2 (New Service Broker Available)

Sergey Marudenko

We’ve just finalized the .NET Cloud Foundry Service, a Microsoft .NET-based service broker that provides a possibility to use MS SQL Server with Cloud Foundry v2. The broker allows for easy developing and deploying Cloud Foundry services using the Microsoft technology stack. For example, you can quickly add support for unsupported databases, since you only need to implement a single interface.

Right now, the broker is distributed with one default service implementation (MS SQL Server). Below is a step-by-step video and tutorial on how to install and use it for your project.


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Top 20 Quotes from Platform, The Cloud Foundry Conference

Volha Kurylionak

Platform: The Cloud Foundry Conference attracted 450+ developers and PaaS experts from around the globe. In this post, we collected top quotes by the speakers and attendees of this amazing event.

1. “PlatformCF was the largest event in the history of PaaS and the most important event since Google App Engine.” —James Watters, Head of Product for Cloud Foundry, Pivotal 

2. “It was epic.” —Andy Piper, Developer Advocate for Cloud Foundry, Pivotal 

Andrei Yurkevich Proposing a Break Out Session
Andrei Yurkevich of Altoros proposing a break out session

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How to Deploy a .NET Application on Cloud Foundry v2

Denis Roschinenko

Authors: Denis Roschinenko, .NET Developer, and Aleksei Malkov, .NET Solution Architect at Altoros

In June 2013, Cloud Foundry v2 became available to public. While this PaaS platform has out-of-the-box build packs for running Ruby, Java, and Node.js applications, its infrastructure is available for .NET developers via Iron Foundry, an open-source toolkit supported by Tier 3. However, neither Cloud Foundry Explorer nor Visual Studio Extension are available for CF v2 at the moment, so the only way to enable a .NET application on CF v2 is using a command line. This blog post describes how to do that and announces the library that Altoros is working on together with Tier 3 to fix this issue.

Cloud Foundry Explorer and Visual Studio Extension

The .NET toolkit for Cloud Foundry v1 (Iron Foundry) included Cloud Foundry Explorer and Visual Studio Extension. These solutions provided a user-friendly interface for running and managing cloud instances. Cloud Foundry Explorer automated deployment tasks and allowed for setting up and running .NET applications almost with a single click. You could install Cloud Foundry Explorer as a desktop application or use a Visual Studio Extension that would integrate into Visual Studio and enable you to push code directly from your IDE.

Figure 1. Launching a .NET app with Cloud Foundry Explorer

Developers were able to choose the number of instances and memory limit, then click “Push,” and the application was running on Cloud Foundry.

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