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Blog on All Things Cloud Foundry

PaaS News Summary: January 2014

Volha Kurylionak

In this brief overview, we’ve gathered Top 10 Platform-as-a-Service news for Jan 2014.

Highlights:

  1. Gartner Released Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Application Platform-as-a-Service
  2. CenturyLink Cloud Supports the BOSH Tool Chain for Cloud Foundry Deployments
  3. January’s Cloud Foundry Advisory Board Meeting
  4. Docker Received $15 M in Series B Funding
  5. Microsoft’s Windows Azure Updates
  6. OpenShift Origin Now Supports CentOS
  7. CloudMunch Expanded Their DevOps Platform to Windows Azure
  8. Apprenda 5.0: Support for Java and Oracle
  9. Jelastic PaaS Integrates with the SendGrid E-mail Infrastructure
  10. Mendix Raised $25 Million in Funding

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Performance of RAID Arrays on Windows Azure: an Alternative to Horizontal Scaling

Sergey Balashevich

While working with several different NoSQL databases heavily loaded with write requests, we faced a situation when the hard drive became a bottleneck. Scaling the cluster horizontally could easily solve this kind of problem, but it would also increase the monthly payments. This is why we decided to take a look at other options.

The first thing that comes to mind when a DB starts experiencing HDD performance issues is to combine several virtual drives into a RAID array, but how will it work with Windows Azure virtual infrastructure? To check this, we compared the performance of a single virtual drive and different RAID arrays (types: 0, 1, 4, 5, and 6) using the Bonnie++ tool for hard drive subsystem verification.

Below you will find the test results and step-by-step instructions on how to configure a RAID array on your own.

 

Test 1: RAID performance under Write/Read/Re-write workloads

In the first test, we measured the performance of different RAID arrays for simple read/write operations:

sudo bonnie++ -d /raid1/ -m 'raid1' -u root -n 100:8192:16384:20 -x10 -s 16g -f > raid1.csv

Bonnie++ was run 10 times (-x10). Each test worked with 100 files of 8-16 KB in size and 20 subdirectories. In total, there were 16 GB of “files” in each iteration. Since a large Windows Azure instance has 7 GB of RAM, we had a chance to avoid caching.

You can see the first test results below. The x-axis stands for megabytes per second, the y-axis indicates repetitions (we ran each test 10 times).

Write test results:

Write_test_x2

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Benchmarks and Research

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